This gentleman has proved to be the most enigmatic of my forebears and I’m fascinated by him.  He was a real survivor.  Information about his life and naval career are a bit patchy as he used several aliases (see note at the bottom of the page).  A lot of the information here has been gleaned from records on Ancestry, The National Archives, findmypast and the British Newspaper Arhive (which I’m fortunate to be able to access free of charge via work).

The formatting for the tables containing information from the newspaper articles doesn’t quite work. I’m afraid, you’ll have to work it out for yourselves as I can’t work out how to do tables in WordPress.

20th September 1809 – Born in [Hawke Street?], Portsea, Hampshire.

22nd Setpember 1809 – Baptised in Gsport RC Church, Gosport, Hampshire.  Godparents: Michael Leahy (mother’s brother?) & Maria Mahony.

1st July 1824 – First entry aged 16 into Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class. Joined HMS Albion.

14th August 1824 – HMS Albion is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

18th December 1824 – Reported on 16th December that the Albion, Webster [Captain’s name?], from Sunderland for Plymouth, is wrecked on the Owers – crew saved, and landed in Littlehampton.*

7th January 1825 – Age 16, promoted to Boy 1st Class on HMS Albion.

15th January 1826 – HMS Albion is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

12th February 1825 – HMS Albion is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

19th February 1825 – HMS Albion is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

5th March 1825 – HMS Albion is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

21st May 1825 – HMS Albion is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

28th May 1825 – The Albion, 74, one of the guard-ships of the Port, was this morning ordered to be paid off and re-commissioned.  … It is said Capt. Fred. Warren, will re-commission the Albion.*

17th October 1830 – Married Mary Ann Nicholson Martin at St Thomas’s, Portsmouth, Hampshire.

29th May 1833 – First son, Henry, born. Baptised on 26th June 1833 at St Mary’s, Portsea, Hampshire.

11th June 1833 – Age 24, volunteered to join the Royal Navy.  Joined HMS Fair Rosamund as an Ordinary Seaman.

From June 1833: Fair Rosamund at Portsmouth.  Then to Lisbon, Sierra Leone, Prince’s Island, Cape Lopez, Ascension, Fernando Point, Sierra Leone, Ascension etc.  On Anti-Slavery Patrol up and down the west coast of Africa stopping and boarding ships being used for the slave trade in order to seize the ships and, if travelling west, to seize the ships and free those slaves being taken to N & S America.†

22nd June 1833 – HMS Fair Rosamond is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

26th June 1833 – Promoted to Able Seaman on board HMS Fair Rosamond.

19th October 1833 – Demoted to Ordinary Seaman on board HMS Fair Rosamond.

1st January 1834 – Promoted to Armourer’s Mate on board HMS Fair Rosamond.

4th January 1834 – HMS Fair Rosamond is stationed around the Cape of Good Hope and the coast of West Africa.*

3rd May 1834 – Reported that on 1st May 1834, the Fair Rosamond was in Ascension.*

7th August 1834 – Demoted to Ordinary Seaman on board HMS Fair Rosamond.

1st June 1835 – Promoted to Armourer’s Mate on board HMS Fair Rosamond.

25th August 1835 – Second son, John Madagascar, born at sea.

10th October 1835 – It was reported that the Fair Rosamond has captured another Slave Vessel, having on board 540 slaves.*

27th January 1836 – Demoted to Ordinary Seaman on board HMS Fair Rosamond.

9th February 1836 – Discharged from service on HMS Fair Rosamond and joined HMS Trinculo.

14th May 1836 – The Trinculo, 18, Commander H. Puget, arrived this morning from Sierra Leone, and brings 2300 ounces of gold dust, and 309 elephants’ tusks, weighing 4tons, 8cwt, 1qr of ivory.  She left Prince’s Island on the 13th February (having been relieved by H.M. ship Pylades, which vessel sailed on a cruise the day she sailed), Island of Ascension 8th March, and Sierra Leone, 29th March.  When she left Sierra Leone, 19 Spanish vessels were lying there waiting adjudication that had been detained by the squadron under the new treaty, no Act of Parliament having arrived for carrying it into effect.  The Trinculo has been in commission since 14th April 1832, during which time she has been actually under canvas 914 days, and run, by log, 82,900 miles.  She has never lost a man by accident, and only three deaths have occurred on board, all from fever, but two of which were from men from merchantmen, who having been left on shore, caught the fever and died soon after coming on board.  The principal part of her service has been on the East and West Coast of Africa, and perhaps her crew have seen as much, in boats and otherwise, as any vessel in commission.  …. The Trinculo is ordered to Plymouth to be paid off.*

1st June 1836 – Paid off and discharged from HMS Trinculo.

1st July 1836 – Age 27, volunteered for service and joined HMS Madagascar as an Able Seaman.

9th July 1836 – Madagascar is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

6th August 1836 – Madagascar is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

27th August 1836 – It was reported that on 23rd August 1836 the Madagascar, 46, Capt. Sir John S. Peyton, arrived on Monday from Spithead: she waits till the Galatea is ready and then proceeds with her to the West Indies.*

5th October 1836 – Deserted service in Kingston, Jamaica.

3rd December 1836 – The Victory will be taken out of the basin when the weather moderates.*

8th December 1836 – Using the alias James Martin, volunteered for service and joined HMS Victory as an Able Seaman.  His age is given as 25.

24th December 1836 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

28th January 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

4th February 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

14th February 1837 – Madagascar is at Carthagena.*

11th March 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

1th March 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

1st April 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

8th April 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

15th Apr 1837 – Madagascar is at Carthagena.*

13th May 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

20th May 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

17th June 1837 – It was reported that the Madagascar, Commodore Sir J.S. Peyton, arrived at Jamaica from Carthagena on the 20th April.*

15th July 1837 – It was reported that the Madagascar sailed for Carthagena on 23rd May.*

5th August 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

2 September 1837 – It was reported that the Madagascar, 42, Commodore Sir John Peyton, was at anchor off Vera Cruz on the 4th of June.*

9th September 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

“NEW ORLEANS, July 31st, 10½o’clock, a.m. – Buy the Creole, July 21st, from Tampico, we have later news, and much specie [money in the form of coins rather than notes].  The Creole reports that three conductas had arrived at Tampico with two millions six hundred thousand dollars, great part of which was for Europe.

The Spanish schooner Laramonist sailed on the 19th inst. for New York with 50,000 dollars.

The schooner Sara Ann was ready to sail for New York on the 22nd inst. with 330,000 dollars.

Distribution of Specie by the Conductas, of 2.600,000 dollars at Tampico:-

dollars

By the Brilliant, for New York                            120,000

By different vessels to New Orleans                  500,000

By the British frigate Madagascar, bound

to Jamaica to meet the packet             500,000

By a vessel bound to Jamaica                100,000

The balance is to be carried to England by the first vessels.

The convoy of Specie must have arrived at Vera Cruz from Mexico.*

23rd September 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

7th October 1837 – Victory is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

1st January 1838 – ROYAL NAVY IN COMMISSION,

Specifying their Ratings, Commanders and present Stations

(from the United Services Journal)

Names                    Guns  Commanders                     Station

Victory                    104     Capt T. Searle                   Portsmouth

FIFTH RATES

Madagascar  46       Capt. Sir J.S. Peyton         West Indies

6th February 1838 – Deserted service.

10th Apr 1838 – Using the alias James Martin, volunteered for service and joined HMS Victory as an Able Seaman. His age is given as 26.

14th Apr 1838 – The Madagascar, 46, Commodore Sir John S. Peyton, K.C.H., has returned to England to be docked, having been ashore on an unknown coral reef.

The Madagascar, 46, is getting ready with all expedition to convey detachments of troops to Canada.  About 200 of the 24th Regiment will embark in her.*

17th Apr 1838 – Use of an alias must have been uncovered as he was returned to HMS Madagascar as an Able Seaman.

14th October 1838 – Third son, Jacob, born. Occupation given as ‘Seaman’.

12th January 1839   It was reported on 10th December 1838 in a letter from Havannah: Her Majesty’s Ships Madagascar and Comus, and the U.S. ships Boston and Ontario, are lying here: the former waiting for a wind to sail for Verz Cruz, for the protection of British interests.*

5th April 1839 – Extract of a letter from HMS Madagascar dated off the Island of Sacrificios, near Vera Cruz, January 25th 1839:*

[Pinnace: a light boat propelled by sails or oars, formerly used as a tender for merchant and war vessels.]

6th April 1839 – The following is an extract of a letter, dated Vera Cruz, 30th March:- Vera Cruz is now deserted: every person having been ordered to quit it under the severe penalty of the Mexican Government.  Hopes are entertained, however, that through the mediation of Mr. Pakenham, the differences between the Mexicans & French will ere long be adjusted.  After the Cornwallis and Edinburgh had remained here for about 14 days, they were ordered to the Havannah: reports says, in consequence of the French Admiral having refused to treat under an intimidating force.  Before the Cornwallis left, Commodore Douglas shifted his broad pennant to the Madagascar, with his son, as Acting Flag-Lieutenant and appointing Lieut. [Wallace] Houston, acting Commander.  … Orders have been sent from England for the Madagascar and Pique to proceed to Jamaica: thence to embark troops and convey them to Halifax: when these ships are going is still a matter of uncertainty; it is rumoured that the Madagascar, at least, will not proceed on that destination for some time: but all appears uncertain at present regarding our movements.

At Sacrificios: the Madagascar.*

13th April 1839 – The Madagascar was shortly to proceed to Halifax.*

10th August 1839 – It was reported that the Madagascar arrived in Halifax on 17th July from Quebec, having been on shore in the gut of Canso, but had received no damage; the Medea steamer was despatched to her assistance.*

7th September 1839 – The Madagascar, 44, Capt. Wallis, came into harbour on Wednesday, and will be paid off the latter end of the ensuing week.*

12th September 1839 – Paid off and discharged from HMS Madagascar.

3rd January 1841 – Fourth son, James, born. Occupation given as ‘Seaman’.

31st October 1842 – Fifth son, Thomas, born. Occupation given as ‘Seaman’.

14th August 1843 – Age 34, volunteered at Valpo [Valparaiso, Chile?] and joined HMS Champion as an Able Seaman.

1st January 1844 – ROYAL NAVY

SHIPS IN COMMISSION, JANUARY, 1844

Names                    Guns  Commanders

BRAZILS AND PACIFIC.

Champion     18       [no name]

*

15th July 1844         ROYAL NAVY

SHIPS IN COMMISSION, JULY, 1844

Names                    Guns  Commanders

BRAZILS AND PACIFIC.

Champion     18       Commander T. Clavell (act) (coming home)

*

23rd Nov 1844 – The Champion, 18, Commander Clavell, arrived on Tuesday, from South America, with a freight of 500,000 dollars, which were transmitted immediately to London , by Messrs. E. and E. Emanuel, of this town.  She sailed from Valparaiso August 10, and worked out of the bay with a French frigate bound to Tahiti.  …  The Champion made the passage from Rio in 47 days .  She was towed into harbour on Thursday, to be paid off.

28th November 1844 – Paid off and discharged from HMS Champion.

18th December 1844 – Age 35, volunteered at Devonport and joined HMS Acorn as a Captain’s Coxswain.  Was imprisoned at some point during his service on HMS Acorn – details of when and why are not known.

21st December 1844 – Acorn is in the harbour at Devonport.*

28th December 1844 – Acorn is in the harbour at Devonport.*

4th January 1845 – DEVONPORT, Thursday January 2nd; The Persian, 16, Commander J. Coryton, and Acorn, 16, have been docked and their bottoms cleaned, and are progressing fast in their equipment.

Acorn is in the harbour at Devonport.*

11th January 1845 – The Acorn, 16, Com. John. E. Bingham, at Devonport, is destined for the coast of Africa.

Acorn is in the harbour at Devonport.*

18th January 1845 – Acorn is in the harbour at Devonport.*

21st January 1845 – Sixth son, Anthony, born. Occupation given as ‘Seaman’.

1st February 1845 – Acorn is in the harbour at Devonport.*

1st February 1845 – DEFECTIVE SYSTEM in the SHIP BUILDING DEPARTMENT of the ADMIRALTY

(From the Plymouth Times)

The Acorn and vessels of her class were said to have been built after the Columbine, but it is easy to prove that this is not the case; their lines of flotation and their draught of water are very different.*

8th February 1845 – DEVONPORT: The Acorn, 6, Commander Bingham, was towed from the harbour into the Sound on Tuesday by the Confiance steam-vessel.  …  The Acorn, 16, Commander Bingham, will in all likelihood, sail on Thursday for South America.

Acorn is in the harbour at Devonport.*

31st August 1845 – Demoted to Able Seaman on board HMS Acorn.

13th September 1845 – The Acorn, 16, Commander Bingham, arrived at Buenos Ayres, from Monto Video, on the 6th June.

20th December 1845 – It was reported that, on 30th September, the Acorn is lying at Martin Garcia.*

27th December 1845 – The Acorn, 16, Commander Bingham, and the Dolphin, 3, brigantine, Lieutenant Levinge, were up the Plato, beyond Buenos Ayres.*

27th December 1845 – Extract of a letter from Monte Video, dated October. 5th. …  The Admiral in the firebrand returned to Monte Video on the 9th of September, leaving the expeditionary Squadron under the command of Captain Hotham, of the gorgon, who proceeded up the River Uraguay, with the Philomel, Acorn, and Fanny (an armed brig taken from the enemy), with a 32-pounder, and commanded Lieut. Key of the Gorgon.  The Dolphin went to them on the 20th with provisions.  The passage up the river appears to have been an arduous task, for vessels of such a draught of water.  They came to off the entrance of the Rio Negro, for 40 miles, till they arrived near the town of Mereecles; from which the inhabitants have fled, taking shelter in the bushes, &c; but finding the current so strong, and the crews much fatigued, they returned to the Squadron.  On the 28th, the Squadron anchored off Presander(?), & finding there was not water sufficient for their proceeding higher, after remaining two days, they weighed to return.  \on the 30th, they proceeded off the mouth of the Parana(?), where they had to wait for orders from the Admiral, previous to their proceeding on an expedition up that River.*

4th April 1846 – Acorn is in Monte Video.*

11th July 1846 – The Acorn, 16, will cruise the Brazil coast.*

26th August 1846 – No. of 298,906 Register Ticket

Daniel Quinn

Born at Portsea                            in the

County of Hants                           20 day of September 1809

Capacity Seaman

Height 5ft 8 0/4                            Hair DBrown

Complexion Sallow                      Eyes Hazel

Marks Crucifix on rt arm

First went to sea as Boy               in the year 1825

Has served in the Royal Navy      Yes 11 years

Has been in Foreign Service                   No

When unemployed, resides at      Lambeth

Issued on the R Uruguay              26 day of August 1846

HMS Acorn

Age when ticketed   37

Can write                Yes

Reported voyages

1845   Out     Captain’s Coxswain – HMS Acorn

Back   AB

1846   Out     AB – HMS Acorn

Back   ”

1847   Out     AB – HMS Acorn

Back   ”

1848   Out     AB – HMS Acorn

Back   ”

TNA Ref: BT113/150 Merchant Seamen Registers (1835-1857)

3rd October 1846 – THE SQUARDON AT BRAZILS: the Acorn, 16, at river Uruguay.

9th January 1847 – ROYAL NAVY

SHIPS IN COMMISSION, JANUARY, 1847

Ships            Guns  Commanders

EAST INDIES AND CHINA.

Acorn            16       J.E. Bingham

*

16th January 1847 – By the latest accounts from Monte Video (October. 29th) we learn that Rear Admiral Inglefield was shortly to proceed thence in the Vernon, 50, with the Melanpus(?) and Acorn, to Singapore, to meet the Agincourt, 72, and relieve Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Cochrane, as Commander-in-Chief on the East India and China station. …  The Acorn, Com. Bingham, is in the Uruguay.*

23rd January 1947 – Acorn was reported to be off Buenos Ayres.*

20th February 1847 – It was reported that the Acorn, 16, had arrived in the Cape of Good Hope on 17th December, from Monte Video and remained at the Cape on the 20th December.

29th May 1847 – The Vernon, 50, Capt. Fitzgerald, (with the flag of Rear Admiral Inglefield), and Acorn, 16, Commander Bingham, from the River Plate, last from the Cape of good Hope, arrived from Singapore, March 22nd, and on the following day proceeded to Penang, where Rear Admiral Sir Thos. Cochrane, in his flag ship, the Agincourt, 72, Capt. J.W. Johnston, was waiting to be relieved.*

26th March 1848 – Discharged from service on board HMS Acorn.

10th March 1849 – First daughter, Hannah, born. Occupation given as ‘Seaman’.

1851 Census – Possible entry as a visitor at Chapel Path, Alverstoke, Hampshire. Age 41. Occupation given as ‘Sailor’ and Condition given as ‘M’.

21st November 1851 – Second daughter, Mary Ann Charlotte, born. Occupation given as ‘Seaman’.

14th January 1854 – Third daughter, Caroline, born. Occupation given as ‘Seaman’.

7th March 1854 – Age 43, volunteered for 10 years’ Continuous Service. Joined HMS Neptune as an Able Seaman.

30th March 1854 – The Neptune is about to be transformed into a sailor’s barrack.*

24th June 1854 – It was reported that the Neptune was, on 13th June, steaming away from Helsingfors with several ships and that several crew members had caught smallpox.

3rd August 1854 – THE WAR

THE BALTIC FLEET

PREPARATIONS FOR ACTIVE WAR

It was reported that the Neptune was at the vanguard of the Baltic fleet:

Van                         Centre                               Rear

Neptune                  Duke of Wellington  Edinburgh

[Interesting news item about which ships were where and when but no further mention of the Neptune,]*

19th August 1854 – OPERATIONS AT THE ALAND ISLANDS

(From The Times)

…   The use of such ships as the Duke Of Wellington, the St. Jean d’Acre, and the Neptune in the Battle in the Baltic is to keep the Russian fleet in check, and the manner in which these huge vessels have been handled by our masters and pilots is such as to call forth the warmest eulogisms from the Russians themselves.*

7th September 1854 – It was reported that, on 22nd August, Rear Admiral Plumridge hoisted his flag on board the Neptune, 120, and assumed the command of the squadron blockading the enemy’s ports in the Gulf of Finland.*

23rd September 1854 – Interesting article about how many of the ships, including the Neptune, that were sent to the Baltic were not suited to the waters they found themselves in, having too large a draught.

30th September 1854 – The Neptune has been ordered home.*

7th October 1854 – It was reported that, on 26th September the Neptune was stationed at Nargen, off Revel.*

4th Nov 1854 – Discharged from HMS Neptune.

10th September 1857 – Uncertain entry as this could be for a different Daniel Quinn (date of birth given as 20th September 1815). Joined HMS Diadem as an Able Seaman.

3rd October 1857 – The Diadem, 32, steam screw frigate, Captain Moorsom, C.B., went out of harbour yesterday afternoon, to try her engines, and made another trial of them today.*

10th October 1857 – The Diadem, 32, screw frigate, Capt. Moorsom, C.B., at Portsmouth, is taking on board her stores and provisions, and will be ready to go to Spithead in the early part of next week.  She will make another trial of her engines, after which she will make a trial of her abilities in the Channel for a short time.  She is very lightly masted.*

17th October 1857 – The gun-carriages of the Diadem’s 65-pounders for her main deck have had to be sent to the Gun Wharf for alteration.  It appears they are high enough for securing the guns inboard.  The Diadem is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

31st October 1857 – The Diadem is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

14th November 1857 – The Diadem, 32, Captain Moorsom, C.B., came into harbour from Spithead on Thursday morning to have her new screw fitted.  She had her compasses tested yesterday.*

5th December 1857 – The Diadem, 31, screw-frigate, Captain Moorsom C.B., went out of harbour again on Tuesday, and after running the measured mile at Stokes Bay, anchored at Spithead.  On this trial she improved in her speed under the influence of the new screw and at a new pitch, having averaged a speed rather better than 12 knots against the wind and tide, royal and top pullant(?) yards across: force of the wind five. The Diadem had another trial yesterday.*

25th December 1857 – The log was hove, and it was ascertained that the Diadem, taking the mean with and against the tide, was realising 11½ knots an hour.  The Diadem is ordered out for a month’s cruise, and will start, we believe, at the end of next week.  She is still short of her complement: she requires about twenty A.B.’s [Able-bodied Seamen] to complete.*

2nd January 1858 – The Diadem, 32, screw steam-frigate, was paid advance on Thursday.  The Diadem got underweigh yesterday, to have another trial of her engines before leaving for a cruise.

9th January 1858 – STATIONS OF SHIPS IN COMMISSION

(Corrected to December 26)

Diadem (sc)(?), 32, Capt. W.Moorsom C.B., Portsmouth*

16th January 1858 – The Diadem, 32, screw frigate, Captain W. Moorsom, C.B., arrived at Spithead on Sunday, from a trial cruise in the Channel, and saluted the flag of Admiral Sir George Seymour, Commander-in-Chief, with 17 guns.*

30th January 1858 – The Diadem, 32, screw, Captain W. Moorsom, C.B., and the Curaçao, 31, screw, Captain T. Mason, have left Spithead for the Thames, as members of the royal squadron of honour ordered to assemble off Gravesend.*

6th February 1858 – The Diadem is at Spithead.*

20th February 1858 – In consequence of the illness of Captain Moorsom C.B. who has been compelled to invalide to Haslar Hospital, Captain Peter Cracroft is appointed to command pro tem, the Diadem, 82, steam frigate, at Spithead, and he took up his commission on Tuesday.  The Diadem sailed from Spithead on Thursday, for a trial cruise as far as the Tagus.*

20th March 1858 – The Diadem, 32, screw, Captain Cracroft, (acting), arrived at Spithead on Tuesday, from Lisbon.  Her cruise has extended over the period of a month.  We understand that Captain William Moorsom, C.B., has entirely recovered from his severe indisposition, and will rejoin the ship and resume his command.

The Diadem is at Spithead.*

18th April 1858 – Discharged from service on HMS Diadem.

19th April 1858 – Joined HMS Hannibal. No other details known.

1st May 1858 – It is rumoured that the Hannibal, 91, Captain the Hon. G.F. Hastings, will in a few days proceed to Spithead as a guardship. Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

5th June 1858 – The crew of the Hannibal has commenced rigging her.  Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

12th June 1858 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

19th June 1858 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

17th July 1858 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

24th July 1858 –  Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

31st July 1858 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

21st August 1858 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

28th August 1858 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

4th September 1858 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

2nd October 1858 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

9th October 1858 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

6th November 1858 – The Hannibal, 91, screw, Captain G.T. Gordon, got up her steam yesterday to air her engines.

7th May 1859 – Hannibal is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

14th May 1959 – The Hannibal, 91, screw, Captain M. Connolly, is about 100 short of her complement of 830. She is complete in her engine department, and goes to Spithead on Monday to take in her lower deck guns, &c.

21st May 1859 – The Hannibal, 91, screw, Captain Matthew Connolly, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral George R. Mundy, steamed out of harbour on Monday morning, and anchored at Spithead, to swing her compasses and take in her lower deck guns and ammunition.  On Thursday her crew was paid advance of wages, and Rear Admiral Mundy shifted his flag on board from blue to white, under the usual salutes.  In the evening the Hannibal embarked 100 of the fourth battalion of the Rifle Brigade, and she will sail today for Malta.*

23rd July 1859 – The Hannibal is at Alexandria.*

13th August 1859 – The Hannibal, Cressy, St. Jean d;Acre, Victor Emmanuel, Brunswick, Doris, and Assurance, all from Malta, arrived at Alexandria on the 23rd of July; and all left on the 1st of August, for Jaffa.*

10th March 1860 – The Hannibal, 91, Captain Connolly, bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Mundy, C.B., commanding the 2nd Division of the Mediterranean fleet, arrived in Malta harbour on the 25th of February, from Corfu, having experienced strong westerly gales during the passage.  The Hannibal was to proceed on Monday, the 5th instant, to Gibraltar.*

31st March 1860 – The Hannibal arrived at Gibraltar from the Mediterranean on 19th March at 10 a.m.*

12th May 1860 – The Hannibal is cruising the channel between Malta and Sicily.*

2nd June 1860 – The Hannibal is at Palermo.*

8th September 1860 – It was reported in a Malta paper that the Marlborough now at Beyrout, will be relieved by the Hannibal and that the Marlborough will take the place of the Hannibal at Naples.*

6th October 1860 – SHIPS OF THE BRITISH NAVY IN COMMISSION

Name of        No. of Horse Commander’s name Station

Vessel                     guns   power

Hannibal       91       450     Capt. A Farquhar     Mediterranean

(bearing flag of

Rear-Adm. Mundy)

*

8th December 1869 – It was reported on 30th November that there were between 30 and 40 cases of small pox on the Hannibal while she was stationed at Malta.

22nd December 1860 – It was reported that, on 15th December, the Hannibal was at Naples.*

19th January 1861 – SHIPS OF THE BRITISH NAVY IN COMMISSION

Name of        No. of Horse Commander’s name Station

Vessel                     guns   power

Hannibal       91       450     Capt. A Farquhar     Mediterranean

(bearing flag of

Rear-Adm. Mundy)

*

23rd March 1861 – Joined HMS Marlborough as a Leading Seaman. HMS Marlborough was commissioned for service in the Mediterranean.

7th Apr 1861 Census – HMS Marlborough was berthed in Portsmouth undergoing repairs. Age 51. Condition ‘M’. Resident at Moore’s Square with Mary Ann (daughter-in-law – possibly married to Henry Quinn – age 27, occupation given as ‘Seaman’s wife’) and grandson Henry (age 2, occupation given as ‘Scholar’). Occupation given as ‘Seaman RN’.

18th March 1862 – Discharged from service on HMS Marlborough in St Vincent (Caribbean).

19th March 1862 – Joined HMS Victor Emanuel. His son John was also on board at this time.

6th May 1862 – Paid off and discharged from service on HMS Victor Emanuel.

7th May 1862 – Joined HMS Asia.

7th February 1863 – Asia is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

14th February 1863 – Asia is in Portsmouth Harbour.*

24th February 1863 – Discharged to Haslar (the Naval Hospital at Gosport, Hampshire). Reasons for his hospital stay are not known.

1871 Census – It appears that Daniel may well have died before this census was taken. The entry has the Head’s name as ‘Jacob’. Age 65. This is the Polish man who was living at 21 Lower Canal Walk, Southampton, Hampshire with Mary Ann Quinn (age 63 – no occupation given) and Caroline Quinn (age 17 – occupation ‘Needle woman’). Occupation given as ‘Shoemaker’. It would appear that he took the Quinn surname so as to appear ‘respectable’.

* Source: Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Accessed from British Newspapers online library (via University of Edinburgh)

† Source: Paul Benyon’s web site http://www.pbenyon.plus.com/18-1900/Index.html .  This site is well worth a visit if you are interested in naval history.

It is unlikely that Daniel fathered the children born from 1838 onwards as he spent most of his time at sea. His wife was, by this time, living with a Polish lodger whose first name was Jacob. Even though Daniel’s name is on all of the birth certificates, it is probable that only Henry and John are his children.

Lauretta Harris provided a huge amount of help with tracking Daniel’s naval employment and I am in indebted to her for this help.  It looks like he joined up as a boy aged 15 but he has used two aliases (that we know of!) and there are gaps in the record where it will be nigh impossible to find the information relating to what he was doing. There is also the complication that his second Continuing Service number has been muddled over the years (I’ve seen 35,905, 38,905 and 38,985) and this, coupled with the aliases, has made it very difficult to work out which records relate to him. His service will be added to this page when it has been untangled to my satisfaction. It might take a while!

There are gaps in the records from 1825-1833, 1839-1843, 1848-1854, 1854-1857 and 1858-1861.

here.

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